• Betty Jennings and Frances Bilas operate ENIAC's main control panel while the machine was still located at the University of Pennsylvania's Moore School.















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ENIAC Computer

In addition to ballistics, ENIAC’s processing power was applied to weather prediction, atomic energy calculations, cosmic ray studies, thermal ignition, random-number studies, wind tunnel design, and more. The Army made ENIAC available to universities free of charge, and it was put to use for a variety of civilian research studies. When ENIAC was retired in 1955, it had been crunching numbers successfully for over 70,000 hours.